How to Repair a Cracked Drywall Ceiling

Shopping List for Repairing a Cracked Drywall Ceiling:
– 5/8-inch plywood
– 2×4
– construction adhesive
– wood shims
– 2-inch-wide painter’s tape
– fiberglass mesh tape
– joint compound
– 1 1/4-inch drywall screws

Tools for Repairing a Cracked Drywall Ceiling:
– drill/driver, fitted with 3/16-inch-diameter drill bit and 1-inch diameter spade bit
– drywall tip, for driving drywall screws to precisely the right depth
– hammer
– caulk gun
– utility knife
– flat trowel and plaster hawk

Remove Mold From a Leaking Roof

Rid Your Home of Mold Caused by a Leaky Roof

A roof that is damaged can cause problems both inside and outside of your home. Leaks are a common symptom of a damaged roof. A leaking roof will provide the perfect breeding ground for mold. Mold is a potential dangerous problem that can cause serious health risks to all who are exposed to it and its spores. When mold is found, it should be dealt with as soon as possible to prevent further damage to your home and your health.

roof leak mold

Stop the Leak

Before the mold process can begin, you must correct the leaky roof. If the leak is not fixed, the mold will continue to grow even after clean-up. Fixing the problem may be as simple as replacing the damaged shingles.

When working on a roof take all the necessary precautions to protect yourself. Make sure the ladder is secure and you are wearing shoes with good traction on the bottom to prevent slipping. Once you have gotten onto the roof, remove the damaged shingles by lifting the edges of the shingles and removing the nails. Before laying down the new shingles, prepare them by rounding their corners with a utility knife. This will make sliding the shingles back into place. Slide the shingle into place and secure with a 6D galvanized roofing nail at each corner. Use a putty knife to smear a dab of roof cement on each nail head.

Before the Mold Removal Process Begins

mold removal process

Equip yourself with the proper safety items during the mold removal process. Anyone involved in the mold removal process needs to wear an N-95 respirator, rubber gloves, safety goggles without vent holes, a long-sleeve shirt and pants.

Discard any porous items that have been ruined by mold. Porous items, such as paper and drywall, cannot be cleaned and disinfected. These items will need to be discarded and replaced. Place the items in a garbage bag and secure closed. Place the bag outside.

Removing the Mold

Use a wet vacuum to remove any standing water that is present. Mix 1/4 cup of a mild dishwashing liquid and 1 gallon of warm water in a 5-gallon bucket. Remove as much mold as possible with a sponge saturated in the dishwashing liquid-water mixture. Apply an approved fungicide to the area. Follow all directions and warnings printed on the fungicide. Allow the area to dry completely. Point fans towards the area to aid in the drying process.

How to Inspect your Gutters

The function of the roofing system is to drain rainwater through gutters put in place to make sure that the water from rooftops does not damage the foundation and the basement. Gutters and downspouts are fixed along the edges to serve this purpose. When the gutter system is clogged or damaged, water will not drain away and can lead to paddling leaks and structural damage. Gutters are to be cleaned and inspected at least twice a year.

 

Besides, you should also trim or cut down nearby trees for they can potentially clog the gutters. You have to be extra careful when using a ladder while trimming the trees. Make sure that the ladder is firmly positioned on an even ground to avoid falling off the ladder.

Begin the inspection by checking for loose gutters and downspouts. Ensure that all the gutter joints are firmly fixed. You may also need to check the spikes where you have attached your gutters to make sure that they are strong. Besides, you can check the downspouts for materials that can clog them and eliminate the dirt if any.

 

Checking for small animals that might reside on your gutters is also a great idea. Some creatures such as squirrels and termites might destroy your gutters. If you find such animals, you may need to get rid of them together with any leaves, twigs and debris in the gutters.

 

You can start by scooping leaves and debris from the gutters. Put the removed materials in a bucket securely placed to the ladder or drop them onto the ground. Flush smaller debris using a hose pipe since the fine material will be moved by pressured water.

Look for cracks beneath the gutters that could lead to leakages. If the water is not moving freely unclog the downspout and it is connected to the underground pipe, remove it from the pipe. Using a strong pressured hose to loosen the debris and it it fails to remove the debris you can use a plumber’s snake to break up the clog.

Look for standing watering the gutter. If the water is moving very slowly the problem might be that the slopes inadequate. Hangers require relocation up or down to create a slight slope towards the downspout.

How to Build a Fireproof Home for Wildfire Areas

Protection With ICFs, Flame-Resistant Roofs, and Cement Fiber Siding

While it’s true that no home can be truly fireproof, measures can be taken that will come close to reaching that ideal. Even structural steel beams will turn to spaghetti when exposed to sufficient heat. As an analogy, a water-resistant diver’s watch can’t survive the Mariana Trench but no damage is sustained during a normal dive.

Building a Fireproof Exterior

Fireproof Exterior

Put simply, a fireproof exterior is simply one that isn’t combustible. Typical residential wood framing (“stick framing” in the industry) won’t stand up to a blaze. Even what’s referred to as a brick home is almost always a brick veneer home with wood studs behind the masonry.

Concrete is the most logical and inexpensive construction material to go with. There are two popular ways to go about this. The first is insulated concrete forms (ICFs). This is also a green, sustainable building practice that contributes to a LEED certification.

ICFs will withstand fires for up to 4 hours

The second exterior building material is the cinder block. These blocks are simply built up from the ground up by masons, in a manner similar to laying brick.

Both of these building practices also lend themselves to areas that are susceptible to hurricanes and tornadoes.

Flame-Resistant Roofing Materials

flame-resistant roof

Roofing material is classified with fire ratings of Class A, Class B, and Class C, with A being the best. So what materials are good candidates in a fire? It depends. Some composition 3-tab shingles get a Class A rating with an estimated 30-year lifespan.

Clay and concrete barrel shingles (think Mediterranean-style) also have a Class A rating and are great for curb appeal and home resale value, but are more expensive. But, their lifespan far exceeds composition shingles.

Metal roofs also do well in fires, and like clay shingles, have a long lifespan. They can also reap a savings on homeowners insurance for protection both from fires and hail damage.

Flame-Resistant Siding

flame-resistant siding

Although cinder block homes are sometimes simply primes and painted, ICF homes need siding. A good bet is a cement fiber product like those produced by Certain Teed and JamesHardie. Cement fiber products are also termite proof and rot proof.

This siding is also considered by the industry to be a green and sustainable building material and counts towards LEED certification. A major benefit is that it comes pre-primed, which eliminates the overhead and time taken to prepare for painting.

Building a fire and wind resistant home just makes good sense. Nobody wants to re-build from the ground up after a natural disaster.